What the Grown-Ups are Thinking and Feeling

What do you want us to know about you?

Comment below and share your message with us.

What do you want to share about your response to the mural or in response to the issues brought to light by the mural?

We’re here to listen!

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13 Comments

  • Susan Witter

    Reply

    I walk a lot, and I often walk past the mural on Monroe Street. The first time, I read it completely. Since then, each time I read one comment and focus on the point of view of that kid; what his/her life must be like; why that comment was picked. I’m getting an incredibly profound and very direct sense of the experience of these children. What a wonderful way to open up their world to us.

    February 21, 2021 at 9:25 pm
  • Nora Hughes

    Reply

    This mural gives me a joyful feeling. I’m happy to see this wall used to boost the voices of students. It’s interesting to read what students have chosen to share; what felt important to them. I hope that when children see this mural, it sends them a message that their words and lives are important and valued. I also like thinking of adults seeing this mural and pausing to remember that children are important, resilient, inspiring people with valuable wisdom and perspectives to offer those in their communities.

    November 23, 2020 at 10:17 pm
    • Anonymous

      Reply

      As an educator in Whatcom County, I believe all children should be treated with respect and their perspectives and experiences should be honored. The words on this mural sound like real kids- like my students’ voices over the last 10 years. I can tell these words weren’t edited or tampered with by adults, but were left exactly as they were written by kids. I have a deep appreciation for the authenticity and intention that went into this project.

      November 24, 2020 at 1:55 am
  • Morgan Hermanson

    Reply

    I had the joy of walking by the mural with my children and stopping to read the words and talk about the ideas. They loved seeing other children held up in such an important way! One of them was thrilled that she shared similar thoughts and feelings with children she had never met. As my little ones grow, they will be able to understand more of what is written there as well as the lessons and values so lovingly cultivated in youngsters by the From a Child’s Point of View program. I whole-heartedly agree and echo the other comments written here. Thank you for enriching our community and future in such an important way!

    November 21, 2020 at 4:09 am
  • Jae

    Reply

    I love having this vibrant installation in my neighborhood. Seeing the faces and reading the voices of kids makes me feel more connected to souls with whom I don’t typically have the chance to interact. What a joy this work is.

    November 15, 2020 at 5:13 am
    • Mary

      Reply

      Delish that the mural brings you close to the kids!

      November 16, 2020 at 11:57 pm
  • Jessica Geer

    Reply

    This project centers the kids in our communities. Seeing their voices and faces projected, serves to show them that they are valued, and serves to remind the rest of us to listen.

    November 13, 2020 at 2:46 pm
  • Marcy Plattner

    Reply

    I live in the Columbia neighborhood but my work is in the neighborhood of Sunnyland. I drive by the POV mural twice a day. Every time I pass by the photos of the children, I smile and say “I hear you”.
    From A Childs Point of View the message is loud and clear…. “Listen, what we think is important,”

    November 13, 2020 at 5:11 am
  • Lauren G. McClanahan, Ph.D. Professor, Secondary Education, WWU

    Reply

    As a teacher educator, I am thrilled to see the culmination of the students’ hard work displayed for the public to view! Part of what makes project-based learning so engaging is the public-facing element that comes at the end. When students engage in authentic work for authentic audiences, the walls of the classroom disappear and generations are brought together to make the learning come alive. I will never tire of learning from (and with) young people, as they have so much to teach me.

    November 12, 2020 at 11:12 pm
  • Deborah Currier, PhD. WWU Theatre Education Professor

    Reply

    What an amazing experience it was to be able to work (and play!) with the youth involved in making the 2020 mural. The opportunity to spend quality, focused time with young students in creatively exploring what they are feeling and thinking reinforced for me how vital Social-Emotional Learning is in our classrooms and teacher education programs – for both educators and students alike. The mural is a beautiful reflection of how deeply and passionately our youth want and need the adults in their lives to take time to connect with them, reflect with them, and listen – not to hear, but to understand. Our children are not afraid of difficult conversations and uncomfortable moments – and we grown-ups need to catch up!
    I can’t wait to take my WWU Theatre Education students to the mural site to see for themselves the incredible wisdom, truth and creativity inherent in all children, and how transformational this work can be for everyone involved in it!

    November 12, 2020 at 2:51 pm
  • Sharon

    Reply

    The children see more than we realize and they’re taking note of how we treat those around us and the earth.

    November 12, 2020 at 5:29 am
  • Katy Valesquez

    Reply

    My reaction to the mural was bittersweet. It made me happy these kids know their strengths, but sad they are so aware of the risks to our environment. It’s an excellent tool to communicate the fact that these children will be the population to live with the consequences of our apathy concerning the environment.

    November 12, 2020 at 3:13 am
  • Anonymous

    Reply

    Such a great project! The 2020 mural got me thinking about mutuality in my relationships with children. We expect a certain equitable exchange of ideas to take place in our adult relationships, but is that exchange as successful or as equitable in our relationships with children? Am I really listening to them and hearing them? Food for thought!

    November 11, 2020 at 11:13 pm

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